Eye Food

Bridget Riley

26th July 1979: Bridget Riley, British painter and leading figure in the Op Art movement, standing in front of one of her curving 'line' paintings at her studio. (Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images)

26th July 1979: Bridget Riley, British painter and leading figure in the Op Art movement, standing in front of one of her curving ‘line’ paintings at her studio. (Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images)

To follow very closely Riley’s work is to see that sameness is courted – because repetition is crucial to an artistic practice – but sameness is also avoided, because it is in the character of a true artistic practice to create change. So, to follow her work is to see that the continuity of artistic identity is asserted, not despite change, but because of change: because change is the very means of achieving continuity. […] The surprise of the first encounter with one of her paintings is owing to an astonishment that an inanimate object has apparently come to life and – more than that – is in communion with the viewer. The viewer’s surprise is, we recognise, is a self-created surprise. Perception is the medium just as much as is the canvas and the paint – more so, in that a painting, the artist acknowledges, ‘only comes to life when looked at from a certain distance’. In a way, it doesn’t exist factually at all; only in the viewer’s perception.

John Elderfield, Creating a way of looking in Bridget Riley: Die Streifenbilder / The Stripe Paintings 1961-2012, Galerie Max Hetzler, Holzwarth Publications and Ridinghouse, 2013

Ach?an 1981 Bridget Riley born 1931 Purchased 1983 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T03816

Bridget Riley Movement G

Nataraja 1993 Bridget Riley born 1931 Purchased 1994 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T06859

Bridget Riley op art

Bridget Riley painting inverted 1

Bridget Riley line drawings

Bridget Riley drawing with color

Bridget Riley print

Bridget Riley Gallery Shot